For most people looking for a break from the unoriginal all-inclusive vacation, a sailing trip in Sardinia turns out to be the perfect answer. The blues here are a clear, virgin blue, the skies are clearer, and the sands feel like velvety shoes whose sole, bespoke objective is to relax you. In fact, it’s easy to feel like you might Sardinia’s first ever tourist here. Unfortunately and fortunately for you, Sardinia is the second largest island in the mediterranean, and by now, a known celebrity favorite and popular holiday destination for Italian natives. Its vast expanse, though, also means there’s enough blue water to go around for everyone. In fact, its beach landscape is so varied that some refer to it as a “micro-continent.” The region is rife with yellow-beige sands and secret grottos, as well as pink granite beaches and minerals galore. And yes, Sardinia is exactly the kind of place that — you probably saw this coming — is best explored on a sailing holiday. 

Below, we’ve outlined a six-day Sardinia sailing itinerary with all the logistical tips that should help you get the most out of your experience. If you ever have any questions, remember that our holiday planning specialists are well versed in both practical and financial suggestions on how to maximize your spend at a place like Sardinia.

Without further ado, here’s our guide to sailing in Sardinia, starting off in Portisco:

Caroline Bochaton / Zizoo

Day 1 (Sunday): Portisco to Prince’s Beach

Depart the Marina in Portisco in the morning and cruise north towards Spiagge del Principe (the Prince’s beaches), so named because they were purported to be Prince Karim Aga Khan’s favorite. The beach is a gorgeous stretch of sand surrounded by picturesque scenery. Be sure to stock up on food and drinks at the bay, since there won’t be many opportunities to do so near the beach. 

Day 2 (Monday): Prince’s Beach to Cannigione

After spending the night at Prince’s Beach, sail towards Cannigione and make a pit stop at the turquoise waters of Pevero Beach. From Pevero Beach, you can slowly make your way towards Cannigione, where you’ll have a few marinas to choose from. If you’re looking to restock on supplies, this is your spot.

Day 3 (Tuesday): Cannigione to La Maddalena

If you need a break from the waters, the islands of La Maddalena and the national park might make the perfect off-sea reprieve. Your options range from the Museo Diocesano La Maddalena which features artifacts from the 16th to 18th Century, to the Maddalena archipelago which stretches out over 20,000 hectares of sea and land and covers dozens of coves. The area is also home to various species of flora and fauna, making it an ideal spot for diving and snorkelling.

Day 4 (Wednesday): La Maddalena to Santa Teresa Galura

About 10 nautical miles west is Santa Teresa Galura, a town located on the northern tip of Sardinia on the Strait of Bonifacio. The southern coast of the neighboring island Corsica can be seen from this town. A popular stop is the Torre Spagnalo (Spagnalo Tower), where you can get a clear view of Corsica. This town is also an ideal spot to do some resupplying before sailing toward Sardinia’s French sister island, Corsica. 

Day 5 (Thursday): Santa Teresa to Corsica

Since Corsica is already visible in the distance, it would be worthwhile to sail towards its charming nearby towns such as Porto Vecchio. The centre is home to many restaurants, cafes, and gelato shops, where you can people-watch or simply stretch your legs. Bonifacio and the Lavezzi archipelago are other nearby areas worth sailing to.

Day 6 (Friday): Corsica to Portisco

The journey back to Portisco is only around 30 nautical miles, so there’s plenty of time to stop by the other towns on the northern side of Sardinia, including Palau and Baja Sardinia. If you missed it on your 4th day, you can also cruise by Spargi, Budelli, Caprera and the other small islands around Maddalena Island. There should still be enough time to return to Portisco for refuelling and eventually dock at the Marina where you embarked from, and spend your final night on board in the marina.†

Top sights on this route:

Visit some of the most stunning beaches in the Mediterranean, explore the charming Italian coastal towns, explore the native fauna and wildlife, and snorkel around the pristine reefs of the archipelago.

What to eat and drink

Pecorino: This hard, dry cheese derived from sheep’s milk is often compared to Parmiggiano Reggiano but tastes notably different. It’s less peppery and slightly tangier, and often eaten with a thick slice of bread, or simply by the chunk.
Bread, bread, and bread: Sardinia is known for its hundreds of types of breads, including thin, crisp breads, breads woven into intricate wreaths, and hard and crusty bread (that invariably opens up into a soft inside).
Seafood: Since Sardinia is an island, seafood is, of course, a staple. It’s cooked into broths with clams and mussels, fancy pasta sauces, and or in the case of lobster, famously served as “aragosta alla catalana” with tomato and onion.
Porcheddu: Perhaps one of Sardinia’s most popular specialties, porcheddu is slow-roasted suckling pig that is equal parts crackling skin, meat, and tender, fat.
Seada: This deep-fried pastry is the ultimate sweet tooth’s delight. It’s filled with honey and pecorino cheese, and covered in honey, sugar, and salt. We’re convinced it’s the Sardinian’s secret weapon meant to fire up and indulge every culinary craving possible, in a single bite.

Buon appetito!

This sailing route is for:

Families, couples, explorers, and all novice and experienced sailors (aka it might be less ideal for solo, inexperienced travelers)

Best time to go sailing in Sardinia:

May to September. The climate in Sardinia is classically mediterranean, meaning you’ll experience hot, dry summers — perfectly tempered by the refreshing sea breeze, of course.

Duration:

6 full days

Have any other questions or ready to book your trip? Fill out our request form on the right sidebar!

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here